A Day in the Life of a Student With an Anxiety Disorder.

Every day is a challenge. I wake up with a nervous stomachache. I get dressed and put on my mascara, trying to hold the brush tightly with shaky hands. I try to eat something, but I can’t. Everything makes me feel sick. At school I greet my friends with a fake smile and try to appear as calm as can be. It doesn’t last long. I spill out my worries in a stream of chatter. They are all irrational, so nobody understands. They tell me to “just calm down” and “it’ll be OK.” I don’t understand why it’s only me fearing…

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Onwards and Upwards.

Been feeling good about myself lately. The end of last year was such a wreck for me so it’s honestly refreshing to see myself going back to being me. The old positive, happy-go-lucky, and passionate person that disappeared after dealing with grief, heartbreak, and loss. Slowly but surely I am getting there and man does it feel good. I missed myself so much. I’m not going to lie and say everyday is easy because that would be a lie. I still get the occasional panic or anxiety attack but I know i’m on the right track. I know this time around…

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Thinking Of Giving Up?

Are you hydrated?  If not, have a glass of water. Have you eaten in the past three hours?  If not, get some food — something with protein, not just simple carbs.  Perhaps some nuts or hummus? Have you showered in the past day?  If not, take a shower right now. If daytime: are you dressed?  If not, put on clean clothes that aren’t pajamas.  Give yourself permission to wear something special, whether it’s a funny t-shirt or a pretty dress. If nighttime: are you sleepy and fatigued but resisting going to sleep?  Put on pajamas, make yourself cozy in bed with a teddy bear and…

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Medical students face ‘alarmingly high’ rate of depression, study finds.

Medical students are at high risk for depression and suicidal ideation, according to a new study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association. In fact, medical students have an “alarmingly high depression prevalence” compared to what is seen in the general population, says study co-author, Dr. Douglas Mata, a resident physician at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston. To conduct the study, researchers reviewed more than 180 studies involving 129,000 medical students worldwide, including those in Canada. They found the incidence of depression among this group was 27 per cent, compared to eight to nine per cent in the…

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It’s Okay to Not Be Okay Sometimes.

I feel much sorrow for the family and friends of the young man that took his life this week. I’ve been thinking about it a lot and even though I never met this individual I know the pain and emptiness that filled him. The cascade we put on pretending we’re happy and strong, because that’s what society expects. High functioning individuals. But deep down we’re empty. sad, and so very tired. Suicide isn’t something that just happens, it’s a conscious choice because of outside failures to help them before then. With schools and job fields getting more competitive, it’s not…

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Where Will All the Old Folks Live?

If you’ve ever been a caregiver to aging parents, you’ve likely been through the battle over when to move them out of the home they love and into something more suitable to their changing needs. That’s only going to get more common as the U.S. population ages. Demographic experts say the population over age 65 will swell from 50 million to nearly 80 million in the next two decades. And all those people will need a place to live. If history is a good indicator, that place is unlikely to be their current home–though that appears to be changing. Even…

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The Secret Work of Nurses.

Recently, I admitted a patient in early labor and the first thing she asked me was when her doctor would be there. In my head, I laughed. I had not seen her doctor all day, even though I thought her doctor would make rounds in the morning. I knew there was a laundry list of reasons why she had probably not made it in by that afternoon: she had lucked out, and not a single one of her patients had delivered that morning, which would have forced her to come in. She had been unlucky before 7 a.m., and had…

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Basic Income in Ontario.

A Canadian province is to run a pilot project aimed at providing every citizen a minimum basic income of $1,320 (£773) a month. The provincial government of Ontario confirmed it is holding public consultations on the $25m (£15m) project over the next two months, which could replace social assistance payments administered by the province for people aged 18 to 65. People with disabilities will receive $500 (£292) more under the scheme, and individuals who earn less than $22,000 (£13,000) a year after tax will have their incomes topped up to reach that threshold. The pilot report was submitted by Conservative ex-senator Hugh…

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Avoiding Depression Caused By Social Media.

New research suggests that comparing yourself with others on Facebook is more likely to lead to feelings of depression than making social comparisons offline. The finding comes from new research on the relationship between social networking and depression. In the review, Lancaster University researchers David Baker and Dr Guillermo Perez Algorta, examined a host of studies on the topic. The international review evaluated research articles from 14 countries including 35,000 participants aged between 15 and 88. Amazingly, 1.8 billion people participate in online social networking sites worldwide, with Facebook alone having more than one billion active users. Concerns over the effect on…

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Moral Blindness.

Case Analysis 1 This report will argue that the actions of Hewlitt-Packard (HP) chairwoman Patricia Dunn in the investigation into boardroom leaks that resulted in the use of highly intrusive methods of surveillance were ethically impermissible. I will begin by describing the relevant facts pertaining to the investigation into the leaks and two ethical concepts that will be used to inform my argument i.e. stakeholders and moral blindness. I will then proceed to argue that by instigating the investigation Dunn bore full responsibility for the methods employed and the resulting fallout. A series of damaging leaks from the HP boardroom…

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Lessons from Level 1 Nursing.

This week has literally been go,go,go,go. Since i’ve finished up my placement for the year, I decided it was a good idea to use those two extra shifts to pick up hours at my part-time job. Boy was I in for a surprise with how much time I lose out in other areas. On top of that with OSCE’s creeping up and our class not performing that great on the midterm test, a couple of peers and I thought it would be a great idea to book four extra hours in the lab to practice our clinical skills and interviews…

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The story of Resuscitation Bed 1.

Here are 3 remarkable true stories about the very same bed space in our emergency department. Resuscitation Bed 1. The first story I wrote after an incident with a colleague at work. The second two were written responses to that story…… ——————– I was working with Nurse K in resuscitation today. K has only been working in ‘The Sus’ for a few shifts now, and as we chatted she mentioned that Resuscitation Bed 1 had some special significance for her. “Oh?” I said, “How come?” She told me that when she was 10 years old her mother came into our…

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