Moral Blindness.

Case Analysis 1 This report will argue that the actions of Hewlitt-Packard (HP) chairwoman Patricia Dunn in the investigation into boardroom leaks that resulted in the use of highly intrusive methods of surveillance were ethically impermissible. I will begin by describing the relevant facts pertaining to the investigation into the leaks and two ethical concepts that will be used to inform my argument i.e. stakeholders and moral blindness. I will then proceed to argue that by instigating the investigation Dunn bore full responsibility for the methods employed and the resulting fallout. A series of damaging leaks from the HP boardroom…

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Bioethics Explored Through Manga.

Not going to lie, I would be pretty down to take this course permitted I wasn’t in the middle of midterms and didn’t have 1000 things to do already. Although I’m not a huge fan of manga, sometimes it’s nice to have visual context to some of the toughest issues facing our healthcare systems and society in general (ex. euthanasia, abortion, drugs and studying). For someone who isn’t too familiar with the topic of bioethics, it’s an interdisciplinary field focusing on the social, legal, and ethical implications of life science and healthcare decisions or topics. I know I am a…

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The Subprime Mortgage Crisis.

This report argues that the practice of offering subprime mortgages is unethical because it eliminates a company’s sense of fiduciary duty to the consumer and other financial institutions, contributing to the instability of the financial industry. I begin by describing the relevant features of the sub prime mortgage industry and two ethical concepts central to my argument, i.e. ‘stakeholders’ and ‘fairness’. I will then argue that the act of offering subprime mortgages detracts from a business’s ability to operate under a fiduciary duty of maintaining fairness to the consumer and other stakeholders, thereby making the practice unethical. The bankruptcy of…

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Empathy Bad For Moral Decision Making?

Paul Bloom says empathy is a capricious feeling that plays on our prejudices. By empathy, the Yale psychology professor does not mean kindness or generosity, but the process of putting yourself in someone else’s shoes as a moral guide. In his book Against Empathy: The Case for Rational Compassion, Bloom argues empathy, as an emotion, often leads to bad moral decisions. “It feels great, but given the nature of our minds, [empathy] leads us to bias decisions, to enumerate decisions, and often, cruel decisions,” Bloom told The Current’s host Anna Maria Tremonti. Bloom says empathy speaks to our unconscious biases, which should have no role in…

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Hospitals as a Safe Space for Opioid Injections?

Interesting opinion piece I came across in the NY Times regarding the promotion of safe injection for opioid users in hospitals. In all honesty, I have the agree with the rationale behind this thought. As healthcare providers we can’t tell our patients to do something and expect them to follow through, particularly when battling addiction. What we can do as professionals is build trust, the foundation of any healthcare provider-patient relationship. It’s the one aspect we can control, by telling or restricting a patient from doing something because of fear, patients will rebel. It’s similar to telling a teenager they…

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Are there any moral principles a health care professional should never violate?

On a regular basis, healthcare professionals are confronted with ethical dilemmas in their practice. Hence, ethical problem solving requires the application of a variety of ethical rules and principles in specific situations[1]. Although ethical theories largely differ from one another, certain ethical principles appear consistently in the realm of bioethics. Thereby, respect for individual autonomy has quickly become a dominant principle in modern medical ethics.[2] Autonomy in this essay shall be defined as individuals being independent and competent agents who are capable of making (a) rational and (b) unconstrained decisions. ‘Rational’ shall apply when an agent is able to ‘reason…

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‘Does the fetus have any moral claims which could limit a pregnant woman’s freedom to abort?

  For such a “simple, routine and frequently performed operation,” the topic of abortion has been one of the most controversial procedures of our time (Jackson, 2001, p 72). Abortion is “the destruction of life after conception and before birth’,” and is bounded between non-conception at one end and infanticide at the other (Glover, 1977, p 120). The central question to be addressed is not whether abortion in itself is morally acceptable, but whether the moral status of the fetus prescribes any moral claims over the pregnant woman that would override her freedom to abort. Varying philosophical positions on this…

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